Oregon’s 2019 Legislative Session is one for the Record Books

Credit unions’ top priority legislation passed well before the Senate scuffle over cap and trade legislation.

7/2/2019 

Oregon Gavel

The Oregon Legislature adjourned Sunday evening, June 30, following a marathon weekend during which the Senate passed more than 100 bills, and the House passed 38 bills. The final weeks of the session can only be described as tumultuous.  

A cap and trade bill, which would have regulated greenhouse gas emissions in the utilities, transportation, and manufacturing industries, effectively died when Senate Republicans walked out for a week, thwarting the Democrats’ “super majority.” Governor Kate Brown ordered State Police to bring the Senators back to Salem, though many fled the state until returning for the final weekend. 

Oregon’s united Credit Union Movement worked with the Northwest Credit Union Association to pass priority legislation well before the controversy erupted. HB 2425 updated the Credit Union Act by allowing for electronic annual meetings. It updates the federal parity provisions in Oregon law, removing the terms of officers of one year—as previously stated—to allowing credit unions’ bylaws to determine terms.  

In addition, HB 2426 passed, allowing for electronic signatures on mortgage closing documents. 

Despite its chaotic conclusion, the 2019 Legislature is being lauded for passing landmark legislation in support of education. 

“While the ending of the 2019 session was unprecedented, it was still a very productive session with key policy and budget bills passing,” said Pamela Leavitt, NWCUA Policy Advisor, Oregon State Advocacy and Grassroots. “One of the most important bills that passed this session was the Student Success Act, HB 3427which represents one of the largest investments in K-12 education in Oregon history.” 

Oregon Senate Majority Leader Ginny Burdick (D-Portland) expressed similar thoughts about legislative successes this session. 

“In all of my time in the Legislature, this session stands out as historic,” said Burdick. “For more than 40 years, our state has been trying to figure out how to adequately fund schools. This session, we created billions of dollars in dedicated, sustainable school funding that will help our children get ahead.” 

An updated list of bills passed and signed by Governor Brown can be found online.